The Highway Code

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307 Highway Code Rules

Highway Code Rule 21

At traffic lights. There may be special signals for pedestrians. You should only start to cross the road when the green figure shows. If you have started to cross the road and the green figure goes out, you should still have time to reach the other side, but do not delay. If no pedestrian signals have been provided, watch carefully and do not cross until the traffic lights are red and the traffic has stopped. Keep looking and check for traffic that may be turning the corner. Remember that traffic lights may let traffic move in some lanes while traffic in other lanes has stopped.

Rule 21: At traffic lights, puffin and pelican crossings. *At pelican crossings only.
Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Crossings (rules 18 to 30)

Highway Code Rule 22

Pelican crossings. These are signal-controlled crossings operated by pedestrians. Push the control button to activate the traffic signals. When the red figure shows, do not cross. When a steady green figure shows, check the traffic has stopped then cross with care. When the green figure begins to flash you should not start to cross. If you have already started you should have time to finish crossing safely.

Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Crossings (rules 18 to 30)

Highway Code Rule 23

Puffin crossings differ from pelican crossings as the red and green figures are above the control box on your side of the road and there is no flashing green figure phase. Press the button and wait for the green figure to show.

Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Crossings (rules 18 to 30)

Highway Code Rule 24

When the road is congested, traffic on your side of the road may be forced to stop even though their lights are green. Traffic may still be moving on the other side of the road, so press the button and wait for the signal to cross.

Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Crossings (rules 18 to 30)

Highway Code Rule 25

Toucan crossings are light-controlled crossings which allow cyclists and pedestrians to share crossing space and cross at the same time. They are push-button operated. Pedestrians and cyclists will see the green signal together. Cyclists are permitted to ride across.

Rule 25: Toucan crossings can be used by both cyclists and pedestrians
Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Crossings (rules 18 to 30)

Highway Code Rule 26

At some crossings there is a bleeping sound or voice signal to indicate to blind or partially sighted people when the steady green figure is showing, and there may be a tactile signal to help deafblind people.

Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Crossings (rules 18 to 30)

Highway Code Rule 27

Equestrian crossings are for horse riders. They have pavement barriers, wider crossing spaces, horse and rider figures in the light panels and either two sets of controls (one higher), or just one higher control panel.

Rule 27: Equestrian crossings are used by horse riders. There is often a parallel crossing
Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Crossings (rules 18 to 30)

Highway Code Rule 28

Staggered’ pelican or puffin crossings. When the crossings on each side of the central refuge are not in line they are two separate crossings. On reaching the central island, press the button again and wait for a steady green figure.

Rule 28: Staggered crossings (with an island in the middle) are two separate crossings
Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Crossings (rules 18 to 30)

Highway Code Rule 29

Crossings controlled by an authorised person. Do not cross the road unless you are signalled to do so by a police officer, traffic warden or school crossing patrol. Always cross in front of them.

Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Crossings (rules 18 to 30)

Highway Code Rule 30

Where there are no controlled crossing points available it is advisable to cross where there is an island in the middle of the road. Use the Green Cross Code (see Rule 7) to cross to the island and then stop and use it again to cross the second half of the road.

Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Crossings (rules 18 to 30)

Highway Code Rule 31

Emergency vehicles. If an ambulance, fire engine, police or other emergency vehicle approaches using flashing blue lights, headlights and/or sirens, keep off the road.

Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Situations needing extra care (rules 31 to 35)

Highway Code Rule 32

Buses. Get on or off a bus only when it has stopped to allow you to do so. Watch out for cyclists when you are getting off. Never cross the road directly behind or in front of a bus. Wait until it has moved off and you can see clearly in both directions.

Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Situations needing extra care (rules 31 to 35)

Highway Code Rule 33

Tramways. These may run through pedestrian areas. Their path will be marked out by shallow kerbs, changes in the paving or other road surface, white lines or yellow dots. Cross at designated crossings where provided. Elsewhere treat trams as you would other road vehicles and look both ways along the track before crossing. Do not walk along the track as trams may come up behind you. Trams move quietly and cannot steer to avoid you.

Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Situations needing extra care (rules 31 to 35)

Highway Code Rule 34

Railway level crossings. You MUST NOT cross or pass a stop line when the red lights show, (including a red pedestrian figure). Also do not cross if an alarm is sounding or the barriers are being lowered. The tone of the alarm may change if another train is approaching. If there are no lights, alarms or barriers, stop, look both ways and listen before crossing. A tactile surface comprising rounded bars running across the direction of pedestrian travel may be installed on the footpath approaching a level crossing to warn visually impaired people of its presence. The tactile surface should extend across the full width of the footway and should be located at an appropriate distance from the barrier or projected line of the barrier.

Law

Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Situations needing extra care (rules 31 to 35)

Highway Code Rule 35

Street and pavement repairs. A pavement may be closed temporarily because it is not safe to use. Take extra care if you are directed to walk in or to cross the road.

Section: Rules for pedestrians (rules 1 to 35)
Subsection: Situations needing extra care (rules 31 to 35)

Highway Code Rule 36

There is one class of manual wheelchair (called a Class 1 invalid carriage) and two classes of powered wheelchairs and powered mobility scooters. Manual wheelchairs and Class 2 vehicles are those with an upper speed limit of 4 mph (6 km/h) and are designed to be used on pavements. Class 3 vehicles are those with an upper speed limit of 8 mph (12 km/h) and are equipped to be used on the road as well as the pavement.

Section: Rules for users of powered wheelchairs and mobility scooters (rules 36 to 46)
Subsection: Powered wheelchairs and mobility scooters (rules 36 to 37)

Highway Code Rule 37

When you are on the road you should obey the guidance and rules for other vehicles; when on the pavement you should follow the guidance and rules for pedestrians.

Section: Rules for users of powered wheelchairs and mobility scooters (rules 36 to 46)
Subsection: Powered wheelchairs and mobility scooters (rules 36 to 37)

Highway Code Rule 38

Pavements are safer than roads and should be used when available. You should give pedestrians priority and show consideration for other pavement users, particularly those with a hearing or visual impairment who may not be aware that you are there.

Section: Rules for users of powered wheelchairs and mobility scooters (rules 36 to 46)
Subsection: On pavements (rules 38 to 40)

Highway Code Rule 39

Powered wheelchairs and scooters MUST NOT travel faster than 4 mph (6 km/h) on pavements or in pedestrian areas. You may need to reduce your speed to adjust to other pavement users who may not be able to move out of your way quickly enough or where the pavement is too narrow.

Law

Section: Rules for users of powered wheelchairs and mobility scooters (rules 36 to 46)
Subsection: On pavements (rules 38 to 40)

Highway Code Rule 40

When moving off the pavement onto the road, you should take special care. Before moving off, always look round and make sure it’s safe to join the traffic. Always try to use dropped kerbs when moving off the pavement, even if this means travelling further to locate one. If you have to climb or descend a kerb, always approach it at right angles and don’t try to negotiate a kerb higher than the vehicle manufacturer’s recommendations.

Section: Rules for users of powered wheelchairs and mobility scooters (rules 36 to 46)
Subsection: On pavements (rules 38 to 40)